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Scale The Wall To Musical Creativity


Traditional Scale Variations for Children


Young students have difficulty understanding scales so we have created a ‘scale game’ to facilitate learning these complex theories. The game is called Dots and the White Note Solo. Parents with talented young children are required to do music with the student, not send them to another room to practice with no involvement. After the child reaches the age of 8, usually he or she can be sent to practice without parental supervision.


Names of the traditional scales:

 1. IONIAN (major scale) — In the key of C there are no accidentals, flats or sharps. 
 2. DORIAN (minor scale) — In the key of C flat the third and seventh notes of the scale. 
 3. PHRYGIAN scale — In the key of C flat the second, third, sixth and seventh notes of the scale. 
 4. LYDIAN scale — In the key of C sharp the fourth note of the scale. 
 5. MIXOLYDIAN scale — In the key of C flat the seventh note of the scale. 
 6. AEOLIAN scale — In the key of C flat the third, sixth and seventh notes of the scale. 
 7. LOCRIAN scale — In the key of C flat the second, third, fifth, sixth and seventh notes of the scale.


There are two other scales that we teach:

A Five Note Pentatonic and a Sixth Note Blues scale.

  • The five-note Pentatonic scale is easily taught and understood by young people by having them play all the black notes which works as an F sharp major Pentatonic scale (the pretty ‘black’ scale). 
  • The five-note Blues scale is in the key of E flat if you play it on all black notes.
  • The sixth-note Blues scale adds an extra grace note which is a more advanced technique because it involves playing a white note with the other black notes.


Students ages 4 and 5 respond well to the all-black solos (minor and major pentatonics) which we call the Boogie version and Pretty version respectively. When they become proficient at this level, they are introduced to the all-white solo which is a seven-note major scale or traditional IONIAN scale (do re mi).


Next we introduce the student to a traditional piano primer level method book such as Faber, Bastian, Schaum, or Thompson.  At this young age, we concentrate on traditional piano study for no more than 10 minutes, or as their attention span allows. 


It is vital that the teacher and parent allow the children to make choices between note-reading, playing the white or black solos according to their own interests. This helps them learn to make choices.  If they want to try it again to get better ask, “Would you like to try it again?” They must agree to the effort to try and play something correctly.


Verbal skills and reading literacy are a large part of early music education.  We encourage our students to read aloud starting with the alphabet and the other simple reading programs where we record them so they can hear the sound of their voice.  This increases left to right vision skills which aid the child in reading notes.


Singing the alphabet with “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” melody helps the child remember letters and gives a voice pitch which is one step above talking and/or reading.


For children who are challenged with pitch recognition, we use solphage with Kodaly music training for the very young. 


Learning scales connected with reading, singing, and note-reading is like a mental crossword puzzle.  Properly implemented and supported by trusted parents, this program will open a child’s understanding. 


We start 5 and 6 year olds playing major and pentatonic scales in C and E flat and then all the other keys over the next two years so they have a concept of composition from the get go for piano, guitar, and violin. Dan's coordinated method books compliment "playing simple things well" in all keys rather than complicated things played poorly in one or two keys. Keith Knighton and Dan have children sing their names with an up or down melody so they can recognize pitches. Children that start in this program early don't think that making music is hard, because it isn't. A solid knowledge of I, V7 chord progressions in all 12 keys brings chordal efficiency to a peak very early in the musical instrument experience.


Preschool Jazz Ballad Improvisation (White Key Solo)




Start Making the Learning of Scales Fun Through Creative Improvisation —

Download Our Professional Accompaniments and Examples Now

One Key at a Time or All 12


Ballad Solo Accompaniment (White Key Solo)

Ballad Solo Accompaniment (White Key Solo)

$0.99 per audio track download
Ballad Solo Example (White Key Solo)

Ballad Solo Example (White Key Solo)

$0.99 per audio track download
Blues Solo Accompaniment (Dots)

Blues Solo Accompaniment (Dots)

$0.99 per audio track download
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Scale The Wall To Musical Literacy


Four Point Program for Beginners

1. Instrument 

2. Freeze 
3. Improve (Scales) 
4. Note Reading

Dan Whitley & Keith Knighton his associate teacher invite you to our…

Young Artist Corner


Violin comes as closes to the sound of the human voice as any other instrument. These instruments can be played exactly in tune, allowing the overtones to be heard and experienced by the students.

The piano is the most popular children's instrument. The guitar also falls into this category. We like the piano because it makes musical sense. We like the guitar because it can be picked up quickly and is very social (ex. campfire songs). With the piano, you can see and teach scales (improvisation is easily understood using the white and black keys). With the guitar, it's portable, popular, and a little knowledge can go a long way. 

With keyboards a student can have music in their home for a fraction of the cost of a piano. They also copy the sound of most of the instruments with electronic sounds we hear in our music today. With the guitar it can be processed to make different sounds as well. The weakness with these instruments is that they are inherently out of tune (because of well-temperment). We have become used to the sound, but true ringing overtones only come with a choir or orchestra.

When teaching the very young. a human-to-human experience is best. Nowadays, computers and technology are an extension to this training. Look for good "apps" that teach, including information on this website. Correctly using this information will develop some of the skills necessary to become a serious student of music. We encourage the one-on-one parent-to-child, or person-to-person musical experience. Many musical families sing and perform together, it is not enough to just listen to music.

Our goal is to empower children with meaningful musical training, in a one-on-one interaction. These are the steps we follow.

1. Well trained hands
A. Left & right finger play
B. Hand and foot work songs: Hot Cross Buns, Pizza Pizza
C. Clapping rhythms

2. Well trained mind.
A. Train left brain
B. Train the right brain
C. All musical elements have a name.
1. Rhythm 
2. Melody 
3. Form
4. Improvisation 
5. Creativity

3. Well trained ears.
Hear small differences in the music. Every thing has a name (1–4 above).

4. Well trained heart.
A. Respect for our musical heritage.
B. Story telling through well selected songs.
C. Recognizes feelings of the heart through this music.

Summary


These Four Elements
1. Hands 
2. Mind
3. Ear 
4. Heart
Balance is the key.

This kind of teaching allows students fertile musical seeds in there minds. By this training, young students become artists. These artists are prepared to perform and record at a professional level in the media.

Children's Chorus

Saturdays at 7:00 AM, MT
 

Kodaly Music Class

Tuesdays at 3:30 and 4:45 PM, MT


Dan Whitley and Keith Knighton Teaching at Boys and Girls Club of Murray, Utah



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Scale The Wall To Reading — Music or Text


Let's Read in Tempo


A magnificent compliment to language learning and remedial reading!


This linguistic approach to regular reading is used with young boys (mostly) that either cannot or will not read music because their eyes dance so much from either TV, or video games, or other attention deficit challenges. We read the notes to a metronome, then we read the words to a metronome, and then we record to background music. These simple exercises are read to music, recorded, and then given to each student on a CD for an additional $10.


Let's Read in Tempo

Let's Read in Tempo

$20.00 per book



A Boy That Didn't Read


I was a boy that didn't like to read.
Some teachers thought I had a disease.
I'd go to the mall, Disney Land, and play with my friends.
When my mother called, I wouldn't come in.

Finally when I would sit down to read my assignments,
My eyes would water, and then jump around and I didn't know what all the words meant.
When they would test me at school my thoughts would wander and I would lose my place.
When the scores came back, I knew it was something I couldn't face.

When the school told my parents I was a resource kid,
They looked at me as if I had three heads.
Before I knew it we had after school tutors.
But nothing changed so they started looking for another school.

In the process they signed me up for music lessons.
I already liked cool music but playing and singing was not in my plan.
When I knew there was no way out I said "I'll play drums".
I'll pound real hard and they'll see that they're wrong.

When my teaqcher said "Please hit your sticks on this pad.
As you read these notes."
It wasn't that bad.
Soon I was playing in the band with a really good student.

He was nice and gave me some advice. I started to play that very moment.
One week my teacher said that "Drummers are hard to beat."
We both laughed and soon started to read.
We read music, but when it started to get hard,
To my surprise we started to read words.
Not like in school but to a beat.
Into a mic it sounded so sweet.

I'm playing and practicing my music and reading every day.
I started reading stories to my little brother. What can I say?
We dress up in a shirt and tie.
Finally I can walk with my head high.

I was scared at first but then it happened.
I started to work and doing something important.
Now I can play music — even more I like to read.
Music lessons and reading in tempo worked for me.

Sometimes I get lazy. All kids do.
But now if I want to work hard I can see things through.


Bryce Connely’s Story

6/26/08

Bryce is a 12-year-old boy who has lots of energy and enjoys life. He has struggled with reading for a long time. At times he literally hated to read because he lacked the ability and thus confidence. Even trying would put him in a defensive mood. His frustration level was so high that he felt overwhelmed.

Since reading is such a big part of life and important to education, we were desperate to find a solution to his problem as this began to affect him in other areas of his life. He would not participate in other activities where he might be called upon to read anything at school or church. 
 
In the past we tried many programs, public and private, which ended in disappointment and discouragement with little or no progress. He tried very hard but ended up feeling like a failure.

In first grade, during math time, he was put in a reading resource program, which caused him to miss his math lessons. In second grade he just kept falling further behind. He would cry and feel upset when we would try to get through his home reading assignment. There were times when we couldn’t get him to go to school.

In third grade we made the decision to go to a private school thinking he would have better instruction. This didn’t work and he grew further behind. He was already below the level of the other children and this just compounded things. His teachers worked very hard but their approach did not work for him.
As parents we spent extra time reading with him but when he tried the frustration would still overwhelm him. We bought books and games and encouraged him but it didn’t help. We found another tutor, an older girl who Bryce liked. She tried but he still struggled. Next we put him in another private school with more one on one. He improved slightly but it was still not coming together.

The school district tested him and because he didn’t fit into and excel in their main stream programs, they labeled him and basically told us they couldn’t do much. We were at our wits end and so was Bryce.

We decided to put things on the back burner for awhile and called for some drum lessons to help Bryce have a feeling of accomplishment in another area. We were blessed very much to be led to Dan Whitley. I called and told him I had an 11 year old needing music lessons. Our discussion led us to Bryce’s trouble with reading.

Dan has a program called “Reading with Tempo”. It was worth a try, we thought. WOW were we ever in for a pleasant surprise. This became the answer to our prayers. Bryce was not too happy to start this but the incentive for him was the drumming part. He was a little worried when I dropped him off the first time, but when I picked him up he came out with a smile on his face. He was already learning to feel good about himself. He came home and found an old brief case in which to put his reading and drumming supplies.

It appears that he was finding a new place in his brain to keep all this learning that was going on with the linguistic approach using rhythm and music. As time went on and he played in his first recital, his self-confidence soared. He was playing drums and reciting poetry.

He was in my Cub Scout Troop and used to sit back and not get too involved. Soon I saw him participating and feeling like he had something of value to offer. I felt him making a real effort for the first time and taking pride in his lessons. Dan’s program worked… it really worked!

We worked on each lesson until he could do it 100 percent tempo with 100 percent accuracy. He started to read with smooth rhythm. He knew when to pause and stop. With each lesson he sounded better and better. Dan recorded all his lessons on CD and you could hear the tone and confidence in his voice improve with each lesson. He enjoyed listening to his own voice and played it at bedtime.

We feel this was the answer. Dan’s efforts have paid off for our Bryce. I know this will be a major part in helping him succeed in his life. He is now 12 and has much more to smile about. Dan and his program has been a great blessing to us and I feel there are so many out there that could find this to be their answer as well. This is an inspired program. Thanks to Dan for his patience, abilities, and talents that he has shared with us.


Jody Connelly


Is addiction to video games a sickness?

Friday, June 22, 2007
Deseret News

By Lindsey Tanner 
Associated Press

CHICAGO — The telltale signs are ominous: teens holing up in their rooms, ignoring friends, family, even food and a shower, while grades plummet and belligerence soars.


The culprit isn't alcohol or drugs. It's video games, which for certain kids can be as powerfully addictive as heroin, some doctors contend.


A leading council of the nation's largest doctors group wants to have this behavior officially classified as a psychiatric disorder, to raise awareness and enable sufferers to get insurance coverage for treatment.


In a report prepared for the American Medical Association's annual policy meeting starting Saturday in Chicago, the council asks the group to lobby for the disorder to be included in a widely used mental illness manual created and published by the American Psychiatric Association. AMA delegates could vote on the proposal as early as Monday.


It likely won't happen without heated debate. Video game makers scoff at the notion that their products can cause a psychiatric disorder. Even some mental health experts say labeling the habit a formal addiction is going too far.


Dr. James Scully, the psychiatric association's medical director, said the group will seriously consider the AMA report in the long process of revising the diagnostic manual. The current manual was published in 1994; the next edition is to be completed in 2012.


Up to 90 percent of American youngsters play video games and as many as 15 percent of them — more than 5 million kids — may be addicted, according to data cited in the AMA council's report.


Joyce Protopapas of Frisco, Texas, said her 17-year-old son, Michael, was a video addict. Over nearly two years, video and Internet games transformed him from an outgoing, academically gifted teen into a reclusive manipulator who flunked two 10th-grade classes and spent several hours day and night playing a popular online video game called "World of Warcraft."


"My father was an alcoholic ... and I saw exactly the same thing" in Michael, Protopapas said. "We battled him until October of last year," she said. "We went to therapists, we tried taking the game away.


"He would threaten us physically. He would curse and call us every name imaginable," she said. "It was as if he was possessed."

When she suggested to therapists that Michael had a video game addiction, "nobody was familiar with it," she said. "They all pooh-poohed it." Last fall, the family found a therapist who "told us he was addicted, period." They sent Michael to a therapeutic boarding school, where he has spent the past six months — at a cost of $5,000 monthly that insurance won't cover, his mother said.


A support group called On-Line Gamers Anonymous has numerous postings on its Web site from gamers seeking help. Liz Woolley, of Harrisburg, Pa., created the site after her 21-year-old son fatally shot himself in 2001 while playing an online game she says destroyed his life. In a February posting, a 13-year-old identified only as Ian told of playing video games for nearly 12 hours straight, said he felt suicidal and wondered if he was addicted.


"I think i need help," the boy said.


Postings also come from adults, mostly men, who say video game addiction cost them jobs, family lives and self-esteem.


According to the report prepared by the AMA's Council on Science and Public Health, based on a review of scientific literature, "dependence-like behaviors are more likely in children who start playing video games at younger ages."


Overuse most often occurs with online role-playing games involving multiple players, the report says. Blizzard Entertainment's teen-rated, monster-killing World of Warcraft is among the most popular. A company spokesman declined to comment on whether the games can cause addiction.


Dr. Martin Wasserman, a pediatrician who heads the Maryland State Medical Society, said the AMA proposal will help raise awareness and called it "the right thing to do."


But Michael Gallagher, president of the Entertainment Software Association, said the trade group sides with psychiatrists "who agree that this so-called 'video-game addiction' is not a mental disorder."


"The American Medical Association is making premature conclusions without the benefit of complete and thorough data," Gallagher said. Dr. Karen Pierce, a psychiatrist at Chicago's Children's Memorial Hospital, said she sees at least two children a week who play video games excessively.

"I saw somebody this week who hasn't been to bed, hasn't showered, because of video games," she said. "He is really a mess." She said she treats it like any addiction and creating a separate diagnosis is unnecessary.


Dr. Michael Brody, head of a TV and media committee at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, agreed. He praised the AMA council for bringing attention to the problem, but said excessive video-game playing could be a symptom for other things, such as depression or social anxieties that already have their own diagnoses.


"You could make lots of behavioral things into addictions. Why stop at video gaming?" Brody asked. Why not Blackberries, cell phones, or other irritating habits, he said.

On the Net: On-Line Gamers Anonymous: www.olganon.org 



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Boys and Girls Club Summer Music Program

Dear parents of Notable Youth students & friends at Whitley Music Studios,

 

   

Headline: Murray Boys & Girls Club Summer Music Program & Utah State Fair Performance
           Sat. Sep. 6th 10:00 AM South Plaza Stage.  

 photo: Bob Dunn, Executive Director of the Murray Boys & Girls Clubs of South Valley, and Dan Whitley of Whitley Music Studios shake hands on their new collaborative venture while music students, C.J. and Drevon Russell, look on in anticipation.


Bob Dunn, Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Clubs of South Valley, lives the B&G Club mission “To inspire and empower youth, families, and communities to realize their full potential as productive, responsible and caring citizens.” Dunn has been working to serve kids for 35 years. Bob's boundless energy and he’s not slowing down in the 30 years he has served as the Executive Director. 

When his nonprofit support slowed and they were facing drastic cut-backs.  He appealed to Beverley Taylor Sorenson, revered philanthropist and founder of "Art Works for Kids Foundation", for a much-needed donation.  “That great lady passed this last year,” Dunn said, “But I remember that she told me, ‘I want to give you more than money.  I want to send you Dan Whitley.’” 

 

photo: The late Beverley Taylor Sorenson, known for her “Art Works for Kids” program and her generous support of the arts in Utah.

 

Dan Whitley, owner and director of Whitley Music Studios, has a long and established career as a professional singer, songwriter, multi-instrument musician, performer, record producer and music teacher.  Whitley and Dunn met and, in Dunn’s words, “Dan came for three days a week all summer with his guitar and a big smile on his face and the kids just loved the program”  The two of them put together a telethon on FOX 13 TV that pulled them out of the 2009 slump.  That spun off into a Christmas program integrating the kids from the center with students from Whitley’s school. 

 

Recently the two men penned an agreement to put on another another Summer Music and Reading program together for 2014.  this time with some long-range plans and hopes.  They want to add a permanent musical & literacy component to the Murray Club curriculum. The benefit from combining music, Technical, Broadcast reading, visual art, dance and drama.On there new stage.

 

The Utah State Fair program will feature The Boys and Girls Club students along with  Whitley’s Pops Orchestra and Youth Chorus on Saturday Sep. 6th at 10:00 PM.  Rehearsals start at the boys and girls club  every Friday – 5-6 p.m. for the Chorus and 6-7 p.m. for the Orchestra.  The public is invited and Dunn and Whitley are extending an invitation to all area music teachers and musicians to join in with their students.  This program works for people with no experience to Advanced players. (Please be prepared to mentor the new students)   “We have room for violin, brass and reed players,” Whitley reported, “but they must attend our Friday rehearsals and the Dress Rehearsal Sep. 5th at B&G Club in Murray.

 

For those wanting to participate by donating instruments, working on not.  Contact Dan Whitley 801-918-7740


**************************************************************

   Thanks, Dan    801-918-7740  www.danwhitleymusic.com
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Kid with Kid

Music teaching method for ensemble performance. The first of its kind. A traditional music study enhancement!

  • Created by Notable Youth founder, Dan Whitley
  • Includes ‘play-along’ piano music books!  
  • Arrangements also available for violin, bass, drums, guitar, brass, and sax
  • Primarily for ages 6–14
  • Older children mentor younger students



Concept


Two children play our flexible half & half arrangements (solo/melody & accompaniment) which together sound like one adult


Advantages

  • Music sounds great in a group which encourages development
  • Practicing is more productive and results accelerated
  • Student retention rate is greater — over 60% stick with piano and other music lessons with our program, while the average dropout rate is up to 90%

If your child is already on his or her way to the Gina Bachauer International Competition then stick with your current program, otherwise contact us!

Please choose from our products for Ensembles

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SUMMER MUSIC DAY CAMPS & CLASSES

Little Musicians   age 5-6   one hour (call for a time)

Do-re-mi, Kodaly, Rhythm, nursery rhyme songs

$12.50

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Little Mozart    age 5-7     one hour 

Introduction to classical music with listening, singing, motion, rhythm

$12.50

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Young Players   age 7-9      two hours

Beginners Introduction to Instruments & Note Reading

Keyboard, percussion, violin, strings, horns, acoustic guitar

$25

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Young Performers
  age 10-16    three  hours

Summer Music Theme + picnic lunch

Performance techniques: showmanship, stage presence, emcee training

Introduction to various music venues- jazz, pop, country, traditional, classics

Mentor Notable Youth Pops Orchestra & Jazz Band

$35 + $ 7 catered box lunch  = $42

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INSTRUMENT PURCHASE - SPRING SALE-
DISCOUNTED 25% THROUGH MAY  (Violin Sale- $100)

 

RECORDING SESSION
DISCOUNTED 25% THROUGH MAY 

(must pay in advance for a block of recording time)

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